NEW, REVISED SAFER HIBERNATION TEXT

All questions relating to hibernation can be placed here. It will make a good reference source for new keepers and keep hibernation related topics in one place, and easy to find.

Re: NEW, REVISED SAFER HIBERNATION TEXT

Postby Madtortlady » Fri Mar 18, 2016 7:21 am

Thank you so much, Andy. Very helpful comments from you (almost 'perennial' problem with Facebook groups :!: ) Someone even suggested 'getting together a scientific group' to get/give advice on this subject. :!: :!: As previously, anyway, I simply intend to not get involved too closely with these groups; yet if there is a person genuinely concerned, 'taking advice' ' of all sorts' from some of these people, I will simply pass them on to the Tortoise Trust :!: :!: -which is what I generally do, anyway.

As to their taking up my advice, has to be up to them :?: :!: YOU are the scientists, after all, and I have always & will carry on doing so - referred them on to the Tortoise Trust. Thanks so much. (hope also your comments on here will, indeed, help other people). Claire Manigrasso
Claire Manigrasso (Madtortlady)! Been keeping Med. spur-thigheds since 30 April 1960. Never ever, sold any! Due to unforeseen circumstances, sadly needing to rehome some of my 'family'!
TORTOISES ARE STILL 'PETS FOR LIFE & BEYOND'!
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Re: NEW, REVISED SAFER HIBERNATION TEXT

Postby Tortoise Trust » Fri Mar 18, 2016 9:46 am

If you wanted one, single, "in a nutshell" why overwintering tortoises that would normally hibernate is not a good idea, here it is.

While keeping them awake, you are going to be feeding them. Feeding stimulates growth and also generates urea in the blood. This is occurring at the very time of year when they will be most deprived of natural UVB and where they are most likely to be subjected to the extreme dehydrating effects of artificial light and heat. The effect is that growth will be accelerated compared to a tortoise in natural conditions, and this growth will occur at the very time when environmental conditions in cativity are at their very worst in terms of preventing MBD and the formation of bladder stones and renal stress due to dehydration. There are other reasons, but this one is of particular concern. I would also note that we have consistently seen higher rates of bladder 'stone' formation in tortoises that are kept awake and feeding than in those that hibernate.
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