250 tortoises seized in Ukraine

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Re: 250 tortoises seized in Ukraine

Postby suej » Wed Jun 24, 2009 3:31 pm

The quotas for 2009 do not make happy reading in particular those for Ghana, Mozambique, Tajikistan, Togo, Tanzania, Uzbekistan not only for sheer numbers but for the species concerned some Sulcatas, quite a lot of Leopards and thousands of Hingebacks.
How long can a country keep catching 17,000 Horsfields before they have none left?
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Re: 250 tortoises seized in Ukraine

Postby Pam » Wed Jun 24, 2009 7:14 pm

Just had a look at this Sue, like you say the numbers are mind boggling. It's a strange coincidence that Uzbekistan has a quota for 27,000 Horsfields plus 17,000 ranched and Tajikistan's wild-caught quota is for the same number..17,000.
I don't think it will be worth a tortoise study trip to this part of the world - there won't be any left. :(

Pam.
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Re: 250 tortoises seized in Ukraine

Postby Tamie Milne » Wed Jun 24, 2009 8:05 pm

Pam wrote:Just had a look at this Sue, like you say the numbers are mind boggling. It's a strange coincidence that Uzbekistan has a quota for 27,000 Horsfields plus 17,000 ranched and Tajikistan's wild-caught quota is for the same number..17,000.
I don't think it will be worth a tortoise study trip to this part of the world - there won't be any left. :(

Pam.


Do the 'trade' have no morals? Do they not think that the wild population cannot sustain these numbers on a yearly basis?

:roll: :twisted:
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Re: 250 tortoises seized in Ukraine

Postby suej » Wed Jun 24, 2009 8:22 pm

I don't think they can have any morals Tamie, the thing that made me the saddest is the Sulcata and Leopards, although they might not all end up here, if they do with the wrong paperwork I know who will be getting a call, the Hingebacks are a real worry, quite a large number for species where the wild populations are virtually unknown, Belliana, Homeana, Erosa and Speckii added to the fact that these species are so sensitive that many will die, either in transit or in the hands of people who have no idea of how to care for them.
One of those occasions when I feel really powerless to stop this, overwhelming devastation.
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Re: 250 tortoises seized in Ukraine

Postby Tortoise Trust » Thu Jun 25, 2009 6:45 am

What's the status of the wild populations? What's the difference between captive bred (classification C), captive bred but not in accordance with resolution conf. 10.16 (classification F) and a ranching operation (classification R)? How are any of these captive breeding operations licensed/checked... do they exist in the first place?

In many cases there is no reliable data on wild populations.

CB:

- The captive population is maintained as a sustainable reproductive unit without ongoing augmentation from the wild (except for the occasional authorized addition of new specimens to avoid inbreeding);

- The operation must either, i) have produced second or subsequent generation offspring or, ii) be managed in a manner that has been demonstrated elsewhere to be capable of reliably producing second generation offspring.

CB not in accordance with 10.16 (F):

Allegedly bred in captivity without fulfilling above requirements, specifically should indicate first gen bred in captivity. The present definition of the term “bred in captivity” has created the need to use the code “F” to accommodate exports of first generation captive-bred offspring from non-registered operations.

Ranching:

The adoption of Resolution Conf. 3.15, on ranching (subsequently repealed and replaced by Resolution Conf. 11.16), introduced the concept of “ranching” as an acceptable basis for considering a population as suitable for transfer to Appendix II. In the context of CITES, “ranching” is defined as the rearing in a controlled environment of specimens taken from the wild.

Ranching, unlike closed-cycle captive breeding, relies on maintaining a healthy wild population from which individuals are removed on a regular basis.

We are about to embark on a survey to establish health and survivorship of animals purchased in the last 3 years. See latest newsletter, just gone to press.

As to what verification of these exporting "farms" is carried out.. well.... put politely, it varies...

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Re: 250 tortoises seized in Ukraine

Postby Pam » Fri Jun 26, 2009 11:05 am

Thanks for clarifying these points for me Andy - appreciate it.
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