British Federation of Herpetologists

Reports and discussions on all aspects of tortoise and turtle conservation.

British Federation of Herpetologists

Postby Tortoise Trust » Wed May 27, 2009 6:07 pm

Does anyone know whether this organisation still exists?

The website seems rather strange.

http://www.f-b-h.co.uk/

Isn't this the organisation, of presumably vast membership, that Chris Newman says he is the "chair"?

http://www.tskaexotics.co.uk/page93.php

Oh, and REPTA ( another one without a website or any visible existence outside of a few individuals)?

It's not this one, by the way...

http://www.repta.co.uk/

It has been discussed on (other forums!) but even there, stuffed as they are with traders, no-one seems any the wiser..

http://www.reptileforums.co.uk/hobby-is ... repta.html

Maybe Chris can enlighten us?

Andy
Tortoise Trust
 
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Re: British Federation of Herpetologists

Postby Chris Newman » Wed May 27, 2009 8:10 pm

Andy,

The FBH has a new website which is under construction, the new site will be http://www.fbh.org.uk. The REPTA website http://www.repta.org is also under construction. I appreciate that some people give websites more importance than others, it is something that needs doing but it not high on my list of priorities.

As you are so concerned about my background below is a brief bit about me and the other organisations that I am involved with, this might be of some interest to you!

Chris


Chris Newman

Born in 1959, he has been an animal keeper from an early age, acquiring his first snake at the age of five. He developed a particular interest in venomous creatures and acquired his first venomous snakes, Mojave rattlesnakes, aged ten. He has subsequently kept over 250 species of reptiles and amphibians and has bred over 80 species, some for the first time in captivity. One of the notable achievements was breeding day geckos (Phelsuma) in 1972. He has also kept numerous other non-reptilian species - invertebrates, fish, birds and mammals. He currently specialises in “exotic” mammals, notably porcupines and possums, both of which frequently breed – probably the only regular breeding programme of these species in the UK.

Chris is profoundly dyslexic and left school in 1976 uneducated and unable to read or write. Due to lack of formal education employment in academia was not forthcoming so on leaving school Chris supported himself with various occupations, mostly associated with his other interest in plants (horticulture). A spell at a zoo, Cotswold Wild Life Park, convinced him that a zoological career was not for him. In the 1980’s Chris spent some ten years working (unpaid) in collaboration with Dr Bernard Whaler at the Queen Elizabeth Collage (University of London) developing more effective and human methods of extracting venom from animals. He was the first to develop a technique to extract venom from live black widow spiders, as shown on the BBC programme Tomorrow’s World & developed and refined methods of extracting toxins from snakes, spiders, scorpions, centipedes and fish.

Chris was the publisher of the Reptilian magazine, the UK’s first specialist reptile & amphibian publication, from 1991 to 2003. He is currently the chairman of the Federation of British Herpetologists and the Federation of Companion Animal Societies. He is consultant to the Reptile and Exotic Pet Trade Association & advisor to the Pet Care Trust and National Association of Private Animals Keepers on herpetological (reptile & amphibian) issues, as well as a consultant to the fresh produce (fruit) industry on arachnological and herpetological pests. He has also acted in an advisory capacity for Customs and Excise, the police and Local Authorities. He has had numerous articles and papers published, both in journals and magazines, as well as authoring several books on the subject of reptiles.

His current work includes working to improve animal welfare and defending the rights for people to keep animals in captivity. Chris is a passionate advocate that both humans and animals benefit from animal husbandry and the keeping of animals as companions. He has always spoken out against the animal rights lobby, which is increasingly influential politically, sometimes at considerable personal risk. Pet keepers are now the regular target for animal rights activists and many so-called welfare groups are actively involved in anti-pet-keeping strategies.

Chris is directly involved with many governmental Working Groups and legislative reviews, such as the Dangerous Wild Animals Act, CITES, Non-native Species. He has been working extensively with the Animal welfare Act since its inception. Chris also works on a voluntary basis manning a 24 hr helpline for animal keepers. This encompasses a whole range of services and offers support and advice about a wide range of issues, from helping keepers who have problems with animal licencing, Local Authorities, RSPCA etc, to providing legal and emotional support.

Today Chris lives with his partner, Jan, and four children (boys) in Southampton. He and the family maintain a large collection of reptiles, amphibians, fish, invertebrates and mammals. The benefits of animal keeping are apparent with the boys, all of whom have learning difficulties, particularly with the youngest child who suffers from ADHD and Autism.
In addition to their interest in animals, the family are dedicated amateur paleontologists, and have assembled one of the largest privately owned collections of non-cephalopod mollusca (dead old snails) in the UK. The family have discovered many species new to the UK and continually break new ground in the quest to further knowledge of UK Eocene fauna. Chris’s particular interests are in the taxonomic lineage of the genus Campanile, which includes the largest ever gastropod (snail), the now extinct Campanile giganteum.

Current Positions
Chair – Federation of British Herpetologists (since 2001)
Chair – Federation of Companion Animal Societies (since 2004)
Member – Sustainable Users Network (since 2000)
Member – Pet Care Trust, Livestock Advisory Panel (since 2000)
Member – Partnership for Action Against Wildlife Crime (since 2001)
Member – SSPCA Advisory Panel on Animal Health & Welfare (since 2006)
Member – Animal Welfare Network for Wales (since 2007)
Member – ProPets (since 2007)
Member – Pet Advisory Committee (since 2008)
Associate member – Associated Parliamentary Group for Animal Welfare (since 2003)
Advisor – National Association of Private Animal Keepers (since 2001)
Consultant – Reptile & Exotic Pet Trade Association (since 2005)

Current Governmental Working Groups
Member – DEFRA Working Group on Non-Native Species
Member – EIG Working Group on Companion Animals

Previous Governmental Working Groups
Chair - DEFRA Working Group on Pet Fairs (2003/2004)
Member – DEFRA Working Group on Pet Vending (2003/2004)
Member – DEFRA Working Group on Definition of Welfare (2004)
Member – DEFRA Working Group on CITES Article 8.2 (2006)

Recent Presentation
Partnership for Action Against Wildlife Crime - (2004)
Hampshire Police Wildlife Crime Conference - (2004)
Partnership for Action Against Wildlife Crime - (2005)
Greater London Authority Conference on Animal Welfare – (2005)
Chartered Institute of Environmental Health Animal Welfare Conference – (2005)
EU Wildlife Trade Enforcement Co-ordination Workshop – (2005)
Police and Customs Wildlife Enforcement Officers Conference - (2005)
Essex Animal Welfare Forum – (2005)
Hampshire Police Wildlife Crime Conference - (2005)
Police and Customs Wildlife Enforcement Officers Conference - (2005)
Partnership for Action Against Wildlife Crime - (2006)
Veterinary Association for Arbitration & Jurisprudence - (2006)
Ornamental & Aquatic Trade Association - (2006)
Partnership for Action Against Wildlife Crime - (2007)
Pet Index – (2007)
Essex Animal Welfare Forum – (2008)
Non-Native Species Workshop – (2008)
Chris Newman
 
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Re: British Federation of Herpetologists

Postby Tamie Milne » Wed May 27, 2009 8:35 pm

Not quite sure where you read Andy was remotely interested in your 'background' to be honest.

So, who 'runs' REPTA with you?

Very interesting thread ( http://www.reptileforums.co.uk/hobby-is ... repta.html )

Tamie
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Re: British Federation of Herpetologists

Postby Chris Newman » Wed May 27, 2009 8:51 pm

Tamie Milne wrote:Not quite sure where you read Andy was remotely interested in your 'background' to be honest.

So, who 'runs' REPTA with you?

Very interesting thread ( http://www.reptileforums.co.uk/hobby-is ... repta.html )

Tamie


REPTA stands for the Reptile & Exotic Pet Trade Association, its members comprise all of the major importers, wholesalers, manufactures and distributors.

Chris
Chris Newman
 
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Re: British Federation of Herpetologists

Postby Tamie Milne » Wed May 27, 2009 9:03 pm

Chris Newman wrote:
Tamie Milne wrote:Not quite sure where you read Andy was remotely interested in your 'background' to be honest.

So, who 'runs' REPTA with you?

Very interesting thread ( http://www.reptileforums.co.uk/hobby-is ... repta.html )

Tamie


REPTA stands for the Reptile & Exotic Pet Trade Association, its members comprise all of the major importers, wholesalers, manufactures and distributors.

Chris


I am aware of what REPTA 'stands' for, so who runs it? Or is everyone, except you, nameless? Are you the spokesperson?

I do wonder why you have joined this forum, I cannot seem to find any posts where you offer assistance, ask for assistance etc re: tort health, husbandry, diet ... so, why have you joined? What tortoises do you keep?

Tamie
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Re: British Federation of Herpetologists

Postby Chris Newman » Wed May 27, 2009 9:24 pm

Tamie Milne wrote:
Chris Newman wrote:
Tamie Milne wrote:Not quite sure where you read Andy was remotely interested in your 'background' to be honest.

So, who 'runs' REPTA with you?

Very interesting thread ( http://www.reptileforums.co.uk/hobby-is ... repta.html )

Tamie


REPTA stands for the Reptile & Exotic Pet Trade Association, its members comprise all of the major importers, wholesalers, manufactures and distributors.

Chris




I am aware of what REPTA 'stands' for, so who runs it? Or is everyone, except you, nameless? Are you the spokesperson?

I do wonder why you have joined this forum, I cannot seem to find any posts where you offer assistance, ask for assistance etc re: tort health, husbandry, diet ... so, why have you joined? What tortoises do you keep?

Tamie


Why such hostilities Tamie?

I can name all of the companies that belong to REPTA if you like, not certain I see the point? I am employed as a consultant, in other words I represent the reptile industry at various levels, including if you like as a spokesperson.

I don’t, as it happens keep any chelonians these days, I was unaware it was a prerequisite that I did to be a members of this forum; I thought an interest in chelonian issues was sufficient!
Forum rules please sign your posts
Chris Newman
 
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Re: British Federation of Herpetologists

Postby lorna » Wed May 27, 2009 10:18 pm

Chris Newman wrote: I am employed as a consultant, in other words I represent the reptile industry at various levels, including if you like as a spokesperson.


The ubiquitous "Consultant". Love it.

Lorna
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Re: British Federation of Herpetologists

Postby Tortoise Trust » Thu May 28, 2009 6:25 am

Are you sure you are not a "plant" by some AR extremist organisation trying to undermine the credibility of the reptile trade?

Just a thought.

Andy
Tortoise Trust
 
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Location: Almeria, Spain

Re: British Federation of Herpetologists

Postby Chris Newman » Thu May 28, 2009 7:57 am

Tortoise Trust wrote:Are you sure you are not a "plant" by some AR extremist organisation trying to undermine the credibility of the reptile trade?

Just a thought.

Andy


Andy,

What an interesting thought – but fortunately, depending upon your view point, your suggestion is wide of the mark. :D

Chris
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Re: British Federation of Herpetologists

Postby suej » Thu May 28, 2009 8:52 am

I joined this forum to learn about chelonian husbandry and issues affecting chelonians.

I have certainly learnt quite a lot from a couple of threads on this forum about the unscrupulous behaviour of some reptile dealers and traders and while I had a vague idea of the things that went on, I had no idea these things were on such a scale. So thank you Chris for allowing the members of the forum to see the shady side of the reptile world, and the grey areas that form the basis of the loopholes that some traders rely on, to get them out of trouble. I had no idea that they had champions of their cause and with the very comprehensive list of organisations that you act as consultant for, I doubt you have time to look after any animals. When you are in a fight its good to know who your friends are, but it is far more important to know your enemy.
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